Species of Greatest Conservation Need

How often will the Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) list be updated?

The SGCN list will be evaluated every five years as part of ongoing revision efforts. 

Why were species added or deleted from the Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) list?

Changes are being made to ensure the list remains up to date and reflects the best available scientific information. Florida's original Action Plan included a list of 974 species identified by experts and stakeholders as having the greatest conservation needs in the state.  One of the main goals of the Legacy Initiative is to identify these vulnerable species and ensure that actions are taken for their conservation.

How was the Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) list created?

Five teams of FWC species experts (focusing separately on mammals, birds, reptiles/amphibians, fish and invertebrates) developed criteria to determine which species should be included on the new list.  The new SGCN list will be finalized after a broad outreach effort to wildlife experts, stakeholders and the public. 

How will the Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) list be used?

The SGCN list is an available resource with the purpose and intent to identify species which are imperiled, or are at risk of becoming imperiled in the future. The goal is for the list to be a useful asset to the conservation community to aid conservation efforts for the protection of Florida's wildlife species.

What if I don't agree with criteria, a species identified on the list or a habitat association for a species on the list?

Please send feedback on how the list, criteria or habitat association can be improved to: ActionPlan.Revision@myfwc.com.   The Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) criteria incorporates the best available scientific information while allowing for expert input.  Having defensible criteria ensures a more scientifically rigorous list, however, no set of criteria or list will ever be free from subjectivity.  The process has been designed to incorporate extensive input from experts, stakeholders and the public.  Comments to improve the list and process are encouraged.

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FWC Facts:
Approximately 1.7 million acres of Florida's remaining natural areas have been invaded by nonindigenous plant species, which have degraded and diminished our ecosystem.

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