Bald Eagle Management

Eagles in tree

The bald eagle, our national bird, is a conservation success story. While no longer listed under the federal Endangered Species Act or state imperiled species rule, bald eagles remain protected by both the state eagle rule (F.A.C. 68A-16.002) and federal law. Here you can find information about the FWC Bald Eagle Management PlanAdobe PDF, eagle biology, nesting surveys, and documented eagle nest territories.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife (USFWS) removed the bald eagle from the federal endangered and threatened species list in 2007. The USFWS continues to manage eagles under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. To learn more, visit the USFWS eagle management and permitting websiteExternal Website.

More information about permits for activities that may disturb or take bald eagles is available on the FWC Eagle Permitting page

Additional Links of Interest:  

Locate an Eagle Nest Territory: Includes an interactive map, address search, export functions, and printable maps. New or undocumented nests may be reported to BaldEagle@MyFWC.com.

Guidance to Avoid Disturbance to Nesting Bald Eagles: This step-by-step guidance will help you determine if an activity near an eagle nest is likely to cause a disturbance, or if a permit is recommended for your project.

FWC Eagle Nest Monitoring Annual Reports: The Fish and Wildlife Research Institute conducts an annual survey of bald eagle nesting territories in Florida. Data collected are used to determine the statewide breeding population size and trends.

FWC Bald Eagle Management Plan (BEMP)Adobe PDF: This plan serves as a conservation blueprint for the species and was developed with input from government, stakeholder, and public partners. Contact Eagle_Plan@MyFWC.com for additional information or assistance.

FWC Bald Eagle Information BrochureAdobe PDF  (1.7MB)

 



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