Suwannee County

Suwannee LakeThis 63-acre man-made, state-owned impoundment is filled with cypress trees and largemouth bass. It is a Fish Management Area and a license is required. Two fishing piers, one fully handicapped accessible, and several earthen fishing fingers provide boatless angling opportunities. The lake is shallow around the edge with good vegetative cover and several old sink-holes out in the trees providing deep cover. Perennial tactics, depending on the season, include pitching jigs and spinners up into "no-man's land"--the brush around the edge, shiner fishing in winter and very early spring, cranking shiner imitators between the trees, and fishing topwater lures and dark plastic worms anywhere. Good fishing for bluegill and redear sunfish occurs during spring and summer.

Note:  A special harvest regulations is in place on Suwannee Lake. Minimum size limit of 10 inches for crappie allows more fish to grow to desirable sizes.

Local contacts: Greens Marine, Lake City 386-755-5390; Rooster's Outfitters 386-234-0851

 

Popular species:

Popular fish species

Fish graphics by Duane Raver, Jr.

 

TrophyCatchTrophyCatch Tracker

TrophyCatch External link is FWC's citizen-science program that rewards anglers for documenting and releasing trophy bass 8 pounds or larger.

Be the first to submit a trophy bass from Suwannee Lake FMA!

 

Current Forecast:

Because of its recent renovation, Suwannee Lake is still in the recovery stages. The distribution of fish is a testament to the project’s success. Fish used to concentrate at the northern stump field section. They are now pretty evenly distributed across the entire lake. The south fishing pier seems to have a slight advantage in terms of fish numbers. If you don’t have a boat, this is the lake for you. Bass are still a bit small but numbers are healthy and fishing reports have been positive. Work shiners around and over visible and submerged woody structure. Bluegill are abundant. Try using the on-site fish attractor map and pick your favorite spot to fish for panfish. Activity will pick up as the weather warms.



FWC Facts:
Four species of black bass occur in Florida's fresh waters. The most popular is the Florida largemouth bass, which can grow to larger than 20 pounds.

Learn More at AskFWC