Bay Scallop

Bay Scallop: Argopecten irradians

Florida Recreational Regulations:

Regulations Bay Scallop Harvest Zone
Minimum Size Limit  None
Daily Bag Limit

2 gallons whole bay scallops in shell, or 1 pint of bay scallop meat per person

Maximum of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops in shell, or 1/2 gallon bay scallop meat per vessel

Season NEW: Opens June 28 - Sept. 24, 2014

Commercial harvest prohibited.

Recreational harvesters need a Florida saltwater fishing license to harvest bay scallops, even when scalloping from shore.

 

Bay Scallop Harvest Zone:

 Bay Scallop Zone Map

Bay scallops may only be harvested in state waters from the Pasco-Hernando County line (near Aripeka - latitude 28 degrees, 26.016 minutes North) to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County (longitude 85 degrees, 25.84 minutes West).

It is illegal to possess bay scallops on waters outside open harvest areas. It is also illegal to land scallops outside open harvest areas. For example, it would be legal to take scallops from waters off the Hernando County coast, but it would be illegal to dock your boat in Pasco County with the scallop catch onboard.

Gear Requirements:

  • Legal Gear: Harvest permitted by hand or landing or dip net

State Waters Harvest Seasons:   Gulf of Mexico Adobe PDF     Atlantic Adobe PDF

 

Management History

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) decided to permanently extend the recreational season by adding two weeks to the end at the June 28, 2012, Commission meeting in West Palm Beach.

The recreational season, which starts July 1 and closed annually on Sept. 11, will now close Sept. 25. 

Commissioners also directed staff to look into the possibility of a future commercial harvest of bay scallops. The commercial harvest of bay scallops has been closed in Florida state waters since 1994.

In 2013, the season was opened early on June 29.

In 2014, the season will open early on June 28.

Links to more Bay Scallop information:



FWC Facts:
Signs on the Suwannee River warn of jumping Gulf sturgeon which, at up to 8 feet and 200 pounds, have been known to injure boaters.

Learn More at AskFWC