Alligator Licenses and Permits

Harvesting alligators from the wild
Agents license
Alligator farming
Alligator processing
Importing alligators or parts  
Alligators in captivity (exhibition, sale, or as pets)  

Harvesting alligators from the wild

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has three programs that provide for harvesting alligators from the wild.

  1. Statewide Alligator Harvest Program,
  2. Private Lands Alligator Management Program, and
  3. Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program 

Each of these programs provides unique opportunities for participation. 

Licenses are also required for alligator processing and farming.

Statewide Alligator Harvest Program (Limited Entry Hunts)

Application dates for the Statewide Alligator Harvest Program

Information for New Applicants

 Successful applicant should receive their license, permit and tags by the end of July.

To hunt alligators in Florida, you must have an:

  • Alligator Trapping License
  • Alligator trapping permits and CITES tags 

IMPORTANT NOTICE:  Review the license, permit and fee information on the Statewide Alligator Hunt Permit information page before purchasing a trapping license or applying for permits and tags.  Specifics on the seasons and methods can found by visiting our Statewide Alligator Hunt webpage.

Private Lands Alligator Management Program

The Private Lands Alligator Management Program allows the harvest of non-hatchling alligators and collection of alligator eggs and/or hatchlings on specified private lands. The private land owner (or his designee) would be required to be licensed (an Alligator Trapping License for adult harvest, and an Alligator Farming License for eggs and hatchlings) and permitted (with appropriate tags for adults and hatchlings) to take alligators or alligator eggs on that property. To download an information package, go to the Private Lands Alligator Program webpage.  

Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program

The FWC contracts with a limited number of private individuals, "Nuisance Alligator Trappers," to remove specific nuisance alligators.  Nuisance alligators may only be handled by contracted Nuisance Alligator Trappers.  To learn more, please visit our Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program webpage.

Agents license

Persons helping Alligator trappers in any of these programs can become licensed as their agents ($51.50 fee) online, using the toll-free phone number, 1-888-HUNT-FLORIDA (1-888-486-8356), or by going to a tax collector's office or license agent (retail outlet that sells hunting and fishing licenses).  Additional permits and tags are required to harvest alligators.

Alligator farming

Because the alligator hide and meat market is extremely volatile, alligator farming is a very tenuous business. For a primer on what alligator farming involves, visit our Alligator Farming webpage. 

Alligator processing

A license is also required to buy and process lawfully acquired alligators and to sell the alligator meat, hides and other parts. To find an application, visit the Alligator Farming webpage. 

Importing alligators

A permit is required to import or export live alligatorsor alligat or parts. Contact the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service at 305-526-2610 regarding country to country export laws, or visit their website (http://www.fws.gov/permits/ImportExport/ImportExport.html).

Alligators in captivity

Live American alligators cannot be taken from the wild without a valid Alligator Trapping License. To possess lawfully acquired American alligators for educational purposes, exhibition, or sale to permitted facilities, you must have a Class II License to Possess Wildlife for Exhibition or Public Sale issued by the FWC Captive Wildlife Program.

To possess lawfully acquired American alligators for personal use, you must have a Class II Personal Pet License. Applicants must be 18 years old, not convicted of certain wildlife related violations and demonstrate 1 year and 1,000 hours of substantial practical experience in the handling, husbandry and care of alligators or other crocodilian species. Activities must be documented and caging requirements apply.  

For more information read the Captive Wildlife Rules and Regulations.

More Information

 



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