Wildlife Research

Wildlife researchers work throughout the state to collect and provide information related to the population status and threats, habitat requirements, life history, and recovery needs of upland, aquatic, and marine species.

Wildlife Research
The responsibility for acquiring and distributing biological and ecological information critical for the science-based management, conservation, restoration and wise use of Florida's wildlife resources comes under the Wildlife Research (WR) section. This section provides information on best management practices for conserving these resources to federal, state and local managers and the public. The WR also administers the Nongame Wildlife Grants program.


Avian Research
Researchers study the life history, population biology, and ecology of birds and provide data to managers for science-based management, conservation, and wise use of Florida's bird life. Data are used in evaluating harvest of game species, developing plans for conservation of Florida's wildlife diversity, and recovery efforts directed at endangered and threatened species and their habitats.

Reptiles and Amphibians Research
Researchers investigate the life history, ecology, population biology, systematics, and harvest response of amphibians and reptiles other than marine turtles. Staff assist in the development of optimum alligator harvest strategies and monitoring populations to assess the effects of harvest and support efforts to conserve gopher tortoises and other reptile and amphibian species.

Terrestrial Mammal Research
Researchers investigate the natural history, population biology, ecology, and behavior of terrestrial mammals. Staff provide scientists, resource managers, and the public with current ecological information necessary for maintaining viable populations of native mammals in Florida.

Marine Mammal Research
Researchers study the life history, population biology, ecology, behavior, and migrations of manatees and right whales in order to address high-priority recovery actions in the federal recovery plans.

Marine Turtle Research
Researchers study the life history, population biology, ecology, behavior, and migrations of marine turtles in order to address high-priority recovery actions in the federal recovery plans.

Additional Information:



FWC Facts:
Horseshoe crabs do not bite or sting. Despite the ferocious look of the tail, it is not used as a weapon, but to right themselves if they are flipped over by a wave.

Learn More at AskFWC