Field biologists in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico locations visit docks and fish houses to conduct interviews with commercial fishers. Information collected consists of catch, effort, and biostatistical data.

Pelagic LonglineThe Fisheries-Dependent Monitoring (FDM) program has nine field biologists involved in the Trip Interview Program (TIP), a cooperative effort with NOAA Fisheries' Southeast Fisheries Science Center. This is a shore-based sampling program, in which field biologists visit docks and fish houses to conduct interviews with commercial fishers. Information collected consists of catch, effort, and biostatistical data, such as length, weight, and biological samples (otoliths, spines, and soft tissue for mercury testing and DNA analysis). Estimates of the age distribution of fish in the population and how the distribution has changed over time is critical information for the assessment of fish populations. One of the benefits of this program is that it validates trip ticket data (catch and effort).

The following table is a quarterly (April - June 2015) summary of interviews and measured fish:

 

April

May

June

Field Station

Interviews

Fish Measured

Hard Parts

Interviews

Fish Measured

Hard Parts

Interviews

Fish Measured

Hard Parts

Tequesta

18

604

145

18

750

316

26

961

415

Indian River

21

239

43

25

302

44

25

298

64

Jacksonville

24

833

84

21

658

64

21

557

27

Pensacola

5

95

79

9

169

99

5

131

72

Apalachicola

11

324

320

5

142

141

11

303

299

St. Pete

19

738

728

22

954

934

31

993

883

Charlotte Harbor

13

276

244

12

325

290

12

309

294

Marathon

24

1,720

34

11

419

77

15

201

36

Cedar Key

3

133

131

3

106

97

4

94

73

Total

138

4,962

1,808

126

3,825

2,062

150

3,847

2,163

Hard parts = otoliths, spines, and biosamples.

FWC biologist at a fish house.

The following table is the 2014 annual summary:

                         2014 Totals

Field Station

Interviews

Samples

Hard Parts

Tequesta

381

13,416

2,428

Indian River

247

3,326

774

Jacksonville

243

7,002

130

Pensacola

65

1,709

718

Apalachicola

95

2,825

2,768

St. Pete

254

10,793

10,125

Charlotte Harbor

127

3,165

2,802

Marathon

390

11,980

1,050

Cedar Key

107

4,517

4,213

All

1,909

58,733

25,008

Hard parts = otoliths, spines, and biosamples.

Visit Southeast Fisheries Science Center to read more about the TIP program



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