Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

Bay-Scallops

Bay Scallops

Bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) live in shallow, nearshore waters along Florida’s Gulf coast, from Pensacola to the Florida Keys. These bivalves are usually found nestled in seagrass beds and are easily distinguished from other bottom-dwelling animals by their electric blue eyes. Bay scallops are capable of swimming by opening and closing their shells rapidly to generate thrust, which can make catching them more challenging.



Bay Scallops - General Information

Learn about the anatomy, reproduction and ecology of the Florida bay scallop.

Bay Scallops Research

FWRI scientists have been studying bay scallops since 1994. Learn about some of these research projects.

Bay Scallop Season and Abundance Survey

In 2014, open harvest season for bay scallops along Florida's Gulf coast runs June 28 - September 24.

Bay Scallop Web Survey Taps Recreational Harvesters

How plentiful are bay scallops along Florida's Gulf coast? Help biologists answer this question by submitting your bay scallop catch data.

Bay Scallop FAQ

Do you have questions about bay scallops? Read the bay scallop FAQ for answers.

Bay Scallops - a set on Flickr

See how the FWC conducts bay scallop research in our new photo set.

Molluscan Fisheries Publications - Bay Scallops

Bay scallop research publications

Bay Scallop Sea Stats Publication

This summary life history of the Bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) includes information about age and growth, distribution and migration, and feeding habits.

Gallery

View photos of bay scallops.


FWC Facts:
Blue-green algae are among the oldest organisms found on Earth. Their fossils date back 3.5 billion years.

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