How to Use this Information

The information on "Planting a Refuge for Wildlife" in these web pages is taken from a booklet by the same name. If you would like a hard copy of the publication, you may either print out each section of this site on your own printer, or you can order this publication from us. (The publication is out of print and no longer available) Through this publication, you will find proven ways to encourage a broad cross-section of Florida wildlife to visit and live around your home. No matter what your time or financial constraints, you can take some of these simple steps to improve wildlife habitat in your back yard.

The first section outlines what animals you might expect to find in your Florida yard and their basic life requirements. Next you will find a step-by-step overview of how to plan a backyard habitat that takes your living requirements into account as well. The manager's checklist should be helpful after you have landscaped your property, or if you already have an established landscape. See the specific management techniques to help you attract the wildlife you want, including birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and butterflies. Solutions for some common wildlife-human conflicts on small properties are discussed under Problem Guests. If you want to supplement your habitat or attract wildlife for close observation, the sections on feeding, housing and providing water for wildlife will interest you. Finally, you will find an extensive listing of the native plants you will want to use to create your backyard habitat. If you seek a more complete discussion of any of these topics, review the resources and publications listed under "For Further Information."

As you are planning your backyard wildlife habitat, learn as much as you can about the wildlife species you wish to benefit. Use native plants to attract the animals native to your areas. This will add to your enjoyment and your efforts to conserve Florida wildlife. Learn to identify and eliminate harmful nonnative invasive species. A final word: be patient and realistic in your expectations. Remember that it will take time, often years, to increase the number and kinds of wildlife in your back yard.



FWC Facts:
One of Florida's smallest owls, the burrowing owl lives in open, treeless areas.

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