Cypress Creek Wildlife Management Area

Managed in cooperation with
Suwannee River Water Management District

 

photo of cypress tree and Suwannee River
Upper Suwannee River
Watershed Initiative

Cypress Creek WMA is located in northeast Hamilton County, north of White Springs. This property consists of floodplain forests and planted pines along more than 10 miles of the upper Suwannee River. Hunting, fishing, wildlife viewing, hiking, and boating are among the recreational activities available in this quiet area. Caution should be used when operating boats and motors in the Upper Suwannee especially during low water periods.  Wildlife that may be observed on the area include white-tailed deer, beaver, turkeys, owls, red-shouldered hawks, and swallow-tailed kites. Anglers will enjoy abundant populations of largemouth bass, sunfish, catfish, and bullhead in the river. A boat ramp is located at Turner Bridge Park.  You can view a map of the Upper Suwannee basin on the Suwannee River Water Management District's website.

Rules Regarding Dogs

  • For purposes other than hunting, dogs are allowed, but must be kept under physical restraint at all times. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.
  • Hunting dogs (if allowed) may be taken onto the WMA after 8 a.m. the day before the opening of a season and shall be removed by 6 p.m. one day after the end of the season. Hunting deer with dogs is prohibited. Hunting with dogs, other than dogs with a shoulder height of 15 inches or less, is prohibited. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited. Dogs on leashes may be used for trailing wounded game.



FWC Facts:
Black bears originated in North America, and have been here at least 1.5 million years.

Learn More at AskFWC