Dunns Creek Wildlife Management Area

Managed in cooperation with
St. Johns River Water Management District

 

photo of Dunns Creek Tram Road
Bruce Williams

Dunns Creek WMA consists of more than 3,000 acres in eastern Putnam County, along the east side of Dunns Creek. The majority of the area is floodplain swamp and hydric hammock, with smaller upland areas of pine flatwoods and mixed forests. These communities support numerous reptiles and amphibians as well as bobcats, raccoons, white-tailed deer, and gray fox. Both migratory and resident birds are found on the area including wood ducks, swallow-tailed kites, red-shouldered hawks, barred owls, yellow-crowned night herons, woodpeckers, and warblers. Recreational activities include hunting, fishing, wildlife viewing, hiking, horseback riding, bicycling, and camping.  Children under the age of 16 are required to wear a helmet when horseback riding on public lands.  For more detailed information go to Nicole's Law PDF.  All horseback riders must have proof of current negative Coggins Test results for their horses when on state lands. Boating and paddling are allowed, although there is no boat ramp on the area. During hunting periods, use of the area is restricted to those with valid quota hunt permits. For additional information, a recreation guide is available from the St. Johns River Water Management District.

Rules Regarding Dogs

  • For purposes other than hunting, dogs are allowed, but must be kept under physical restraint at all times. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife.  Hunting with dogs is prohibited. Dogs on leashes may be used for trailing wounded game. 
  • View FWC's Regulations Summary for Dunns Creek for an area map, hunting seasons, permits, fees, and area regulations.



FWC Facts:
Whooping cranes eat aquatic invertebrates (insects, crustaceans and mollusks), small vertebrates (fish, reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals), roots, acorns and berries.

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