Dinner Island Ranch Wildlife Management Area

Photo by Karla Brandt
Karla Brandt
Crested Caracara

Southwest of Clewiston in southern Hendry County, Dinner Island's thirty-four square miles of pastures, sloughs, pine flatwoods and oak hammocks form a vital link to surrounding wetlands that connect the Caloosahatchee River with the Big Cypress Swamp fifty miles to the south. In an area where wild landscapes are rapidly being converted to agriculture and residential and commercial uses, this connection secures habitat vital to the survival of the Florida panther and many other threatened wildlife species.

Roseate spoonbills, Florida sandhill cranes, crested caracaras, wood storks, white-tailed deer and wild turkeys are common sights along the network of improved and unimproved roads open for wildlife viewing, hunting, cycling, horseback riding and hiking.

 




FWC Facts:
When the weather is very cold, a group of bluebirds, and several other bird species, will occasionally roost together in a nest cavity for warmth.

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