Cutaneous fibromas on a deer's head.
Cutaneous fibromas present on the head of a white-tailed deer.

Cutaneous fibromas, a.k.a deer warts, are hairless wart-like nodules found on the skin of white-tailed deer, most commonly on the head, neck, and shoulders.  They can be numerous and clumped or singular and widely distributed.  The fibromas are caused by a virus thought to be transmitted through biting insects or direct contact.  Fibromas typically do not cause any problems for white-tailed deer, but in rare cases they can interfere with sight, breathing, eating, and walking or cause secondary bacterial infections.  In the case of a secondary infection (evident through fluid at infection site), white-tailed deer would not be fit for human consumption.  The virus cannot be spread to domestic livestock or humans.  

FWC Facts:
Numerous marine species, like blue crabs, redfish, white shrimp, stingrays, tarpon, are found more than 100 miles upstream in the freshwater portions of the St. Johns River.

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