Cutaneous fibromas on a deer's head.
Cutaneous fibromas present on the head of a white-tailed deer.

Cutaneous fibromas, a.k.a deer warts, are hairless wart-like nodules found on the skin of white-tailed deer, most commonly on the head, neck, and shoulders.  They can be numerous and clumped or singular and widely distributed.  The fibromas are caused by a virus thought to be transmitted through biting insects or direct contact.  Fibromas typically do not cause any problems for white-tailed deer, but in rare cases they can interfere with sight, breathing, eating, and walking or cause secondary bacterial infections.  In the case of a secondary infection (evident through fluid at infection site), white-tailed deer would not be fit for human consumption.  The virus cannot be spread to domestic livestock or humans.  



FWC Facts:
The average Florida manatee is about 10 ft. long and close to 1,200 lbs. They can reach up to 13 ft. and 3,500 lbs. Calves are 3-4 ft. long & weigh 60-70 lbs. at birth.

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