Marine Turtle Decals

You can help protect Florida's endangered and threatened marine turtles by making a donation to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.  Your donation will help fund research at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute and conservation efforts by the Imperiled Species Management Section.  With each donation of five dollars or more, you will receive your choice of one of the waterproof decals featured.  Current year marine turtle decals are available at Florida County Tax Offices.

FWC has a limited supply of some of the earlier decals. We would like to offer them to individuals who are interested in collecting them. Please indicate the decals you would like to obtain by checking the appropriate area on the order form and sending a check for the number of decals selected.  The decals will be sent to you within 4-6 weeks.

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2013-2014 Loggerhead turtle hatchling
artwork by Ann Marie Tavares, FWC.

 

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Tortugas Marinas de la Florida
Loggerhead Turtle - Florida's State Saltwater Reptile

Sea turtles were among the native wildlife seen by Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon and his crew in 1513, when he named the peninsula La Florida, land of the flowers. Ponce de Leon also designated a cluster of islands 70 miles west of Key West as Las Tortugas, because of sea turtles nesting there. As with other Florida beaches, the islands of Dry Tortugas National Park still have loggerhead, leatherback, green and hawksbill turtles coming back year after year to lay their eggs.

The loggerhead turtle visited Florida beaches long before Spanish explorers arrived 500 years ago. This hard-shell sea turtle weighs about 250 pounds as an adult, with a reddish-brown, heart-shaped shell and pale yellow bottom. Its large head and strong jaws enable loggerheads to eat conch, whelk, crabs and other hard-shelled prey. Adult and juvenile loggerheads occur in many coastal habitats, including near shore reefs, seagrass, oyster beds and estuaries. Loggerheads also forage on deep reefs and at the surface of open sea. Females emerge at night to nest on Florida’s sandy beaches from April to September; hatchlings also typically emerge from nests at night. Sea turtles on the beach at night can be confused by oceanfront lights, which pose significant risk to adults and hatchlings. In 2012, 98,601 loggerhead nests were documented on Florida’s east and west coast beaches, the highest count in 33 years!

Previous Years Decals

2012-2013
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Green Sea Turtle
by Lizabeth West

2011-2012
Sea Turtle Decal 11-12

Hawksbill Sea Turtle
by Jim Abernathy

2010-2011
Sea turtle Decal 10-11

Green Sea Turtles
by Dr. Blair Witherington

2009-2010
Sea turtle Decal 2009-10

Loggerhead
by Dr. Blair Witherington

2008-2009
Sea turtle Decal 2008-09

Kemp's Ridley
by Lizabeth West

2007-2008
Sea Turtle Decal 2007-08

Green Sea Turtles
by Dawn Witherington

2006-2007
Sea Turtle Decal 2006-07

Hawksbill
by Lizabeth West

2005-2006
Sea Turtle Decal 2005-06

Leatherback
by Lizabeth West

2004-2005
Sea Turtle Decal 2004-05

Loggerhead
by Dean Gallagher

2003-2004
Sea Turtle Decal 2003-04

Green Sea Turtles
by Dean Gallagher

2002-2003
Sea Turtle Decal 2002-03

Kemp's Ridley
by Shems Hamilton

2001-2002
Sea Turtle Decal 2001-02

Hawksbill
by Tom Markey

2000-2001
Sea Turtle Decal 2000-01

Leatherback
by Doug Perrine

1999-2000
Sea Turtle Decal 1999-2000

Loggerhead
by Dawn Witherington

1998-1999
Sea Turtle Decal 1998-99

Loggerhead
by Michelle G. Pasquin

1997-1998
Sea Turtle Decal 1997-98 

Green Sea Turtles
by Michelle G. Pasquin

1996-1997
Sea Turtle Decal 1996-97

Kemp's Ridley
by Dawn Witherington

1995-1996
Sea Turtle Decal 1995-96

Leatherback
by Jamie Serino

1994-1995
Sea Turtle Decal 1994-95

Green Sea Turtles
by S. Castle

 

1993-1994
Sea Turtle Decal 1993-94 

Loggerhead
by FL DNR

 

 

1992-1993
Sea Turtle Decal 1992-93

Hawksbill
by Dee Knott



FWC Facts:
The Gulf sturgeon spawns 140 miles upstream from the mouth of the Suwannee River, one of the last pristine rivers with no dams to bar its path.

Learn More at AskFWC